Twenty years after the first clinical evidence of Untitled acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS) was reported, Untitled AIDS has become the most devastating disease humankind has ever faced. Since the epidemic began, more than 60 million people have been infected with the Untitled virus . Untitled AIDS is now the leading cause of death in sub-Saharan Africa. Worldwide, it is the fourth-biggest killer.

Untitled
Global AIDS Epidemic Map
Darker shade to dark blue indicates greater severity
of the AIDS epidemic in the region.

Global AIDS Epidemic Map -- 1999

Click on figure for the latest pictographic image of the estimated annual number of new HIV infections worldwide (2003), and by region, 1988 to 2003 (pdf, 2 MB)


In 2003, an estimated 4.8 million people (range: 4.2–6.3 million) became newly infected with Untitled HIV . This is more than in any one year before. Today, some 37.8 million people (range: 34.6–42.3 million) are living with Untitled HIV , which killed 2.9 million (range: 2.6–3.3 million) in 2003, and over 20 million since the first cases of AIDS were identified in 1981.
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Untitled AIDS Epidemic 2003

Total PLWA -- 38 M
New HIV Infections -- 4.8 M
Deaths -- 2.9 M

by Region
Sub-Saharan Africa -- 25 M
Middle East & N. Africa -- 0.48 M
Asia-- 7.4 M
Latin America -- 1.6 M
Caribbean -- 0.43 M
Eastern Europe & CAS -- 1.3 M
High-income countries -- 1.6 M

Untitled Asia and the Pacific

An estimated 7.4 million people (range: 5.0–10.5 million) in Untitled Asia and the Pacific are living with Untitled HIV . Around half a million (range: 330 000–740 000) are believed to have died of Untitled AIDS in 2003, and about twice as many—1.1 million—(range: 610 000–2.2 million) are thought to have become newly infected with Untitled HIV . Among young people 15–24 years of age, 0.3% of women (range: 0.2–0.3%) and 0.4% of men (range: 0.3–0.5%) were living with Untitled HIV by the end of 2003. Epidemics in this region remain largely concentrated among injecting drug users, men who have sex with men, sex workers, clients of sex workers and their sexual partners.

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Untitled Sub-Saharan Africa

Sub-Saharan Africa has just over 10% of the world’s population, but is home to close to two-thirds of all people living with Untitled HIV —some 25 million (range: 23.1–27.9 million). In 2003 alone, an estimated 3 million people (range: 2.6–3.7 million) in the region became newly infected, while 2.2 million (range: 2.0–2.5 million) died of Untitled AIDS . Among young people 15–24 years of age, 6.9% of women (range: 6.3–8.3%) and 2.1% of men (range: 1.9–2.5%) were living with Untitled HIV by the end of 2003.

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Untitled Middle East and North Africa

With the exception of a few countries, systematic surveillance of the epidemic is not well developed in North Africa and the Middle East. Furthermore, there is inadequate monitoring of the situation among populations at higher risk of Untitled HIV exposure, such as sex workers, injecting drug users and men who have sex with men. This means that potential epidemics in these populations are being overlooked.

In many countries, available information is based only on case reporting, and suggests that around 480 000 people (range: 200 000–1.4 million) are living with Untitled HIV in the region, which has a prevalence of 0.2% of the adult population (range: 0.1–0.6%). Some 75 000 people (range: 21 000–310 000) are believed to have become newly infected in 2003, and Untitled AIDS killed about 24 000 (range: 9900–62 000) that year. Among young people aged 15–24, 0.2% of women (range: 0.2–0.5%) and 0.1% of men (range: 0.1–0.2%) were living with Untitled HIV by the end of 2003.

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Untitled Eastern Europe, Russia and Central Asia

Diverse Untitled HIV epidemics are under way in Eastern Europe and Central Asia. About 1.3 million people (range: 860 000–1.9 million) were living with Untitled HIV at the end of 2003, compared with about 160 000 in 1995. During 2003, an estimated 360 000 people (range: 160 000–900 000) in the region became newly infected, while 49 000 (range: 32 000–71 000) died of Untitled AIDS . Among young people aged 15–24, 0.6% of women (range: 0.4–0.8%) and 1.3% of men (range: 0.9–1.8%) were living with Untitled HIV by the end of 2003.

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Untitled Latin America and the Caribbean

Around 1.6 million people (range: 1.2–2.1 million) are living with Untitled HIV in Latin America. In 2003, around 84 000 people (range: 65 000–110 000) died of Untitled AIDS , and 200 000 (range: 140 000–340 000) were newly infected. Among young people 15–24 years of age, 0.5% of women (range: 0.4–0.6%) and 0.8% of men (range: 0.6–0.9%) were living with Untitled HIV by the end of 2003. In Latin America, Untitled HIV infection tends to be highly concentrated among populations at particular risk, rather than being generalized. In most South American countries, almost all infections are caused by contaminated drug-injecting equipment or sex between men. Low national prevalence is disguising some very serious epidemics. For example, in Brazil—the most populous country in the region, and home to more than one in four of all those living with Untitled HIV —national prevalence is well below 1%. But infection levels above 60% have been reported among injecting drug users in some cities. Moreover, the picture varies considerably from one part of the country to another. In Puerto Rico, more than half of all infections in 2002 were associated with injecting drug use, and about one-quarter were heterosexually transmitted.

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Untitled More Developed Countries (MDCs)

An estimated 1.6 million people (range: 1.1–2.2 million) are living with Untitled HIV in high-income countries. Around 64 000 (range: 34 000–140 000) became newly infected in 2003, and 22 000 (range: 15 000–31 000) died of Untitled AIDS . Among young people 15–24 years of age, 0.1% of women (range: 0.1–0.2%) and 0.2% of men (range: 0.2–0.3%) were living with Untitled HIV by the end of 2003.

Visit Untitled More Developed Countries (MDCs) for more in-depth analysis of the AIDS epidemic in high-income countries, in Western Europe, the United States, and Canada.